Justice as Fairness: Part 3

John Rawls warns against a political life dominated by dogmatic fanaticism or apathetic resignation. The University of Tennessee Howard H. Baker Jr. Center for Public Policy and the Knox County Public Library invite you to participate in a study of his book, Justice as Fairness: A restatement. Each podcast episode is in a discussion format facilitated by a UT faculty member with expertise on Rawls's work. No previous knowledge of Rawls's work is expected.

Part 3: The Argument from the Original Position

with Iris Goodwin, UT College of Law

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Other podcasts in the Justice as Fairness series:

Part 1: Fundamental Ideas with Joe Cook, UT College of Law

Part 2: Principles of Justice with Otis Stephens, UT College of Law

Part 4: Institutions of a Just Basic Structure with Matt Deaton, UT Dept. of Philosophy

Part 5: The Question of Stability with David Reidy, UT Dept. of Philosophy

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Knox County Public Library Podcasts by Knox County Public Library is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. © 2010 Some Rights Reserved. Music credit: "Random Opus" by Robert A. Wolf (available on Mevio).

Justice as Fairness: Part 2

John Rawls warns against a political life dominated by dogmatic fanaticism or apathetic resignation. The University of Tennessee Howard H. Baker Jr. Center for Public Policy and the Knox County Public Library invite you to participate in a study of his book, Justice as Fairness: A restatement. Each podcast episode is in a discussion format facilitated by a UT faculty member with expertise on Rawls's work. No previous knowledge of Rawls's work is expected.

Part 2: Principles of Justice with Otis Stephens, UT College of Law

Click here to download Part 2, or use the player here:

Other podcasts in the Justice as Fairness Series:

Part 1: Fundamental Ideas with Joe Cook, UT College of Law

Part 3: The Argument from the Original Position with Iris Goodwin, UT College of Law

Part 4: Institutions of a Just Basic Structure with Matt Deaton, UT Dept. of Philosophy

Part 5: The Question of Stability with David Reidy, UT Dept. of Philosophy

Creative Commons License
Knox County Public Library Podcasts by Knox County Public Library is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. © 2010 Some Rights Reserved. Music credit: "Random Opus" by Robert A. Wolf (available on Mevio).

Justice as Fairness: A Community Book Discussion

John Rawls warns against a political life dominated by dogmatic fanaticism or apathetic resignation. The University of Tennessee Howard H. Baker Jr. Center for Public Policy and the Knox County Public Library invite you to participate in a study of his book, Justice as Fairness: A restatement. Each podcast episode is in a discussion format facilitated by a UT faculty member with expertise on Rawls's work. No previous knowledge of Rawls's work is expected.

Part 1: Fundamental Ideas
with Joe Cook, UT College of Law

Click here to download Part 1, or use the player here:

Other Justice as Fairness podcasts:

Part 2: Principles of Justice with Otis Stephens, UT College of Law

Part 3: The Argument from the Original Position with Iris Goodwin, UT College of Law

Part 4: Institutions of a Just Basic Structure with Matt Deaton, UT Dept. of Philosophy

Part 5: The Question of Stability with David Reidy, UT Dept. of Philosophy

Creative Commons License

Knox County Public Library Podcasts by Knox County Public Library is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. © 2010 Some Rights Reserved. Music credit: "Random Opus" by Robert A. Wolf (available on Mevio).

Historic Knoxville News #15: Miss Hazen's Courtship in Court

HistoricKnoxNewsPodcastMiss Evelyn Hazen, a beautiful and independent woman of a prominent family, caused a stir in Knoxville Society when she sued her lover for jilting her. The reading (transcript here) is edited and compiled from several Knoxville Journal stories filed in Covington, KY as Miss Hazen's courtship was examined in a court of law.

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See The seduction of Miss Evelyn Hazen for more about the breach of promise court case.

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Readings by the 2009 Knoxville Writers' Guild contest winners

GenericPodcastOn October 1, 2009, the Knoxville Writer’s Guild met at Laurel Theater to celebrate the winners of the 2009 writing competition. Knox County Public Library is proud to present the winners reading from their work in our podcast series with the kind permission of the Writer’s Guild.

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Knox County Public Library Podcasts by Knox County Public Library is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. © 2009 Some Rights Reserved.

Fountain City history: an audio walking tour

GenericPodcastDr. J.C. Tumblin led a walking tour of historic Fountain City on September 14, 2009 for the organization Fountain City Town Hall. You can listen and follow along with the map and illustrations in this booklet. We begin and end in Fountain City Park.

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Historic Knoxville News #14: Market Square farmers market

HistoricKnoxNewsPodcastIn this podcast we read two articles (transcript here) from the 1920's and 30's that appreciate the development of Market Square as a farmer's market. Author Jack Neely is a special guest on the commentary portion; his book is entitled Market Square: a history of the most democratic place on earth. We also recommend the Media High student project video Market Square: earth, brick, & fire. Part 1, the Market House.

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Knox County Public Library Podcasts by Knox County Public Library is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. © 2009 Some Rights Reserved.

Peter Taylor story on audio

One of the best podcasts out there (other than ours) is the New Yorker Fiction Podcast, "a monthly reading and conversation with The New Yorker’s fiction editor, Deborah Treisman." A contemporary writer selects a short story from the magazine archives to read aloud, followed by a discussion with Treisman. This month is a special treat for Knoxville's many Peter Taylor fans: Marisa Silver reads Peter Taylor’s “Porte-Cochere.” Go listen, and then tell us what you think by leaving a comment here.

Brown Bag, Green Book #5: Animal, Vegetable, Miracle

BrownBagGreenBook Ben Epperson, Coordinator of Beardsley Community Farm, led a well-attended discussion about local food, based on the memoir Animal, Vegetable, Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver. "Animal, Vegetable, Miracle is an important story for all of us," says Epperson, "especially here in East Tennessee where our growing season can last up to 10 months."

In Animal, Vegetable, Miracle, author Barbara Kingsolver and her family abandoned the industrial-food pipeline to live a rural life—vowing that, for one year, they’d only buy food raised in their own neighborhood, grow it themselves, or learn to live without it. Part memoir, part journalistic investigation, It's an enthralling narrative that will open your eyes in a hundred new ways to an old truth: you are what you eat.

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About Ben Epperson

Ben Epperson studied Literary and Linguistic Theory (English) at the University of TN, Knoxville. In 2005 he moved with his partner, Elly, to the Czech Republic where he taught English. After they moved back to the States in 2007 to have their first child, a job working on Creekbed Farm sparked Mr. Epperson's interest in sustainable agriculture. When the family moved back to Knoxville and discovered Beardsley Community Farm he was electrified by the possibilies and opportunites he found there. "We'd like to see a small portion of Knoxville growing its own food again. We're here to build the buzz for sustainable urban agriculture, and it's working."

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Knoxville and the Civil Rights movement

GenericPodcastRobert J. Booker has been a civil rights leader, teacher, state legislator, historian, newspaper columnist, and Knoxville City Council member. In this program offered by the East Tennessee Historical Society, he speaks to a group of history teachers about his involvement in lunch counter sit-ins in Knoxville during the Civil Rights movement. Listen and then discuss this episode using the comment form at the bottom of this page.

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Brown Bag, Green Book #4: Coming Clean

BrownBagGreenBookIn Coming Clean: Breaking America's Addiction to Coal and Oil, Michael Brune, executive director of Rainforest Action Network (RAN), shows us how we, as motivated citizens, can kick our own fossil-fuel habit and pressure policymakers and corporations to change their energy priorities. His vivid reports remind us of the economic, environmental, moral, and public-health costs of fossil-fuel dependence, and how our government and international banks are complicit. Brune also describes the most promising developments in renewables, biofuels, and efficient design, and offers an inspiring vision of the clean energy future within our reach.

Dr. Dana Christensen, Associate Laboratory Director of the Energy and Engineering Sciences Directorate of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) led our discussion. "Michael Brune is a political activist who has been successful in bringing attention to social/environmental causes," says Dr. Christensen. "His success in gaining agreements from companies such as Home Depot and Lowe’s toward not selling old growth rain forest products is an example of how a small number of citizens can change corporate behaviors when the cause is defensible. Coming Clean is his effort to change the purchasing habits of the general citizenry; a much greater challenge than influencing a small number of companies. Indeed, the general citizenry purchase electricity, not the coal used to produce the electricity, thus making the messaging even more difficult. The book represents an attempt to simplify the message about the impact that fossil fuels are having on our environment so that the general public will stand up and listen."

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About Dr. Christensen

Dr. Christensen is the Associate Laboratory Director of the Energy & Engineering Sciences Directorate of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Dr. Christensen came to ORNL from the University of California where he was the principal Associate Laboratory Director of Threat Reduction at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Prior to this he was the Deputy Associate Laboratory for Energy and Environment at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, also operated by the University of California. He has twenty-nine years of management experience in material science, nuclear energy, fossil and renewable energy, nuclear materials management and scientific research in support of DOE and other government agencies and industries.

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Historic Knoxville News #13: The Hanging of Mary, a circus elephant

HistoricKnoxNewsPodcastThis podcast episode tells the strange and sad story of how an elephant came to be executed in Erwin, TN in 1916 for killing her handler. The reading is an abridgment of an article entitled “The hanging of Mary, a circus elephant,” by Thomas Burton published in Tennessee Folklore Society Bulletin, volume 37, number 1, March 1971. The full article is available at the McClung Collection.

Take a look at The day they hung the elephant by Charles Edwin Price, and at this version on RootsWeb.

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Brown Bag, Green Book #3: The Green Collar Economy

BrownBagGreenBook In The Green Collar Economy, author Van Jones illustrates how we can invent and invest our way out of the pollution-based grey economy and into a healthy new green economy. Chris Woodhull, a Knoxville City Councilman who co-founded TRIBE ONE, led a community discussion of the book.

"I am interested in this book because it combines two significant community challenges with one very practical solution," says Woodhull. "We address the disenfranchisement of inner city youth to the workforce at the same time that we are building a greener city. This approach is tailor made for us here in Knoxville."

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About Chris Woodhull

Chris Woodhull is currently serving his second term as Knoxville City Councilman at-large. He is the Executive Director of TRIBE ONE, an inner city Christian ministry that encourages at-risk youth to walk away from gangs and destructive lifestyles and lead productive lives. He co-founded TRIBE ONE with the late Danny Mayfield, who was also a Knoxville City Councilman. Mr. Woodhull is a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Asheville. He has completed classes in negotiation at Harvard and entrepreneurship at Yale.

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Brown Bag, Green Book #2: Cradle to cradle

BrownBagGreenBookElizabeth Eason, a Knoxville architect accredited with the U.S. Green Building Council's LEED system, led a community discussion of the book Cradle to cradle: Remaking the way we make things by William McDonough and Michael Braungart.

McDonough and Braungart question the wisdom of "reduce, reuse, recycle" and propose that products might be designed so that, after their useful life, they provide nourishment for something new--either as "biological nutrients" that safely re-enter the environment or as "technical nutrients" that circulate within closed-loop industrial cycles, without being "downcycled" into low-grade uses (as most "recyclables" now are).

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About Elizabeth Eason

Elizabeth Eason is the Principal Architect at Elizabeth Eason Architecture llc, the Knoxville based design studio she established in 2003. She has more than 19 years of professional experience working with a wide variety of commercial, civic, non-profit and residential clientele. Her firm specializes in sustainable design of buildings and communities throughout East Tennessee.
Ms. Eason is a licensed architect and an accredited professional with the US Green Building Council's LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) system. She is an active board member of Knox Heritage, Chair of the US Green Building Council East Tennessee Chapter, and serves on Mayor Haslam's Energy & Sustainability Task Force. She is a member of Leadership Knoxville's 2009 class and serves on Governor Bredesen's Energy Policy Task Force.

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Historic Knoxville News #12: Desperado Captured

Kid Curry was one of the most wanted criminals of the Wild West, a cohort of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. After participating in the Great Northern Train Robbery, he hid out in Knoxville until one evening he got into fisticuffs in a Bowery pool hall. Police arrived on the scene, and in the exchange of gunfire the bandit, whose real name was Harvey Logan, escaped from the police he wounded. Logan’s own wounds led to his identification and capture two days later.

Take a look at Harvey Logan in Knoxville by Sylvia Lynch. A fun book about some of the most famous desperadoes of the Wild West is Desperate Men: The James Gang and the Wild Bunch.

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Read the transcript here.

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Knox County Public Library Podcasts by Knox County Public Library is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. © 2009 Some Rights Reserved.

Brown Bag, Green Book #1: Hot, Flat and Crowded

BrownBagGreenBookMike Edwards, CEO and President of the Knoxville Chamber, led a community discussion of the book Hot, Flat and Crowded: Why We Need a Green Revolution and How It Can Renew America by Thomas Friedman.

In his groundbreaking book, Thomas Friedman discusses what he sees as America’s surprising loss of focus and national purpose since 9/11, as well as the global environmental crisis, which is affecting everything from food to fuel to forests. Friedman explains why he believes this is a great challenge, but also a great opportunity--one that America cannot afford to miss. Not only is American leadership the key to the healing of the earth--it is also our best strategy for the renewal of America.

Edwards says he chose Hot, Flat and Crowded because it "hits the nail on the head. We're facing a big uphill climb, but fortunately, in East Tennessee we've got some world class resources to deal with the issues ahead of us."

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Historic Knoxville News #11: On board Airship Knoxville

In 1922, Knoxville Aero Corporation was the proud owner of the first privately-owned aeroplane in the city, christened Airship Knoxville. This article (transcript) tells of one of the corporation's efforts to find a commercial application for their cutting-edge investment--that of running charter flights into the Smokies. You can find additional information on Knoxville's early aviation history in some issues of the FatBoyz Aviation Newsletter.

Download with this link.

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Celebrating the Sunsphere

GenericPodcastOn July 28, 2008 the Sunsphere was both the site and the subject of a luncheon lecture by one of the architects who worked on creating the theme structure for the 1982 World's Fair. William Denton spoke about the challenges of constructing the world's first spherical building, and what he hopes Knoxville will do with it now. Former mayor Randall Tyree spoke following Mr. Denton's remarks.

Download the recording here. Knox County Public Library is pleased to present this recording in our podcast series.

See the library catalog for more materials about the World's Fair and its site in Knoxville.

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Historic Knoxville News #10: The Million-dollar Gay Street Fire

On April 8, 1897, a small fire began in back of a hotel in Gay Street's business district and quickly spread through the expensive establishments that were the pride of the city. The fire claimed five lives and a million dollars' worth of property. Citizens criticized the city council for spending money on a new market house and Centennial celebrations rather than spending more on the newly-established professional fire department. Ordinances regulating fire escapes and shared walls found new support, as well.

Download the podcast here.

Like to listen? You cansubscribe for free to get new episodes automatically downloaded so you can listen whenever and wherever you want. Read the transcript here.

The McClung collection has sources about the fire and Knoxville firefighting history. You can find three photographs of the fire and its aftermath in Knoxville by Ed Hooper.

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Historic Knoxville News #9: Gay Street Shootout

On a rainy October day in 1882, a shotgun blast ripped across Gay street showering bystanders with stray shot and bringing instant death to the intended target, General Joseph A. Mabry. After the echoes of a few more shots faded, the gathered crowd was shocked to find three corpses in the street, several men and a horse wounded, and two men under arrest. One corpse was that of a prominent banker, Major Thomas O'Conner--the very man who had fired the first shot.

Download the recording here.

Get the transcript here. The McClung collection has a book about Major O'Conner with a photograph of Joseph Mabry: May the sod rest lightly. As for the Mabry family, their story gets even more interesting, but maybe we will get to the daughter in a later episode.

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Readings from the new Knoxville Writers' Guild anthology

GenericPodcastOn October 9, members of the Knoxville Writers' Guild met at Lawson McGhee Library to share readings from Outscape: Writings on Fences and Frontiers, the guild's newest anthology, edited by Jessie Janeshek and Jesse Graves. Poetry and short fiction were read by Judy Loest, Laura Still, Pamela Schoenewaldt, Dawn Coppock, and R.B. Morris.

Download Outscape readings

The library is pleased to provide this recording in our podcast series.

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The Big Read: The Grapes of Wrath, the New Deal, and the American political imagination.

In 1939, Steinbeck published the story of a desperate family searching for a better life during the Great Depression in The Grapes of Wrath. By that time, President Roosevelt had instituted the New Deal--programs designed to help such families and restore public faith in America. In this podcast Dr. Michael Fitzgerald, UT Howard Baker Center Fellow and political science professor, relates the book to the New Deal and its enduring transformation of government and the American political imagination.

On the night before Dr. Fitzgerald's remarks recorded here, the presidential candidates Barack Obama and John McCain faced off in a debate with a town hall format. In this debate, a questioner asked "Since World War II, we have never been asked to sacrifice anything to help our country, except the blood of our heroic men and women. As president, what sacrifices will you ask every American to make to help restore the American dream and to get out of the economic morass that we're now in?" Dr. Fitzgerald makes a reference to that question in his speech.

Download the recording here.

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Knox County Public Library Podcasts by Knox County Public Library is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. © 2008 Some Rights Reserved.

Historic Knoxville News #8: Veterans. The Old Soldiers are here.

For three days in October of 1890, Knoxville hosted an enormous reunion of Confederate and Union soldiers near the site of Fort Sanders. The visitors nearly doubled the city's population, and they all needed places to sleep, and food. How did Knoxville step up to the challenge? What did the veterans do at the reunion?

Download the podcast here. The transcript is here.

Here's a photograph of some Union soldiers from the McClung Digital Collection that was probably taken sometime in the 1880s.

Here's a brief explanation of the battle of Knoxville from the Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture.

Click here to find more library resources on the battle at Fort Sanders.

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Knox County Public Library Podcasts by Knox County Public Library is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. © 2008 Some Rights Reserved.

Three Cups of Tea with Ed Francisco

book coverEd Francisco is a professor and writer in residence at Pellissippi State Technical Community College. In this recording, he opens a public discussion of the book Three Cups of Tea by Greg Mortenson by offering an analysis of the book as "a species of romance known as the hero's quest."

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Knox County Public Library Podcasts by Knox County Public Library is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. © 2008 Some Rights Reserved.

Historic Knoxville News #7: Unearthed--the remains of John Sevier

John Sevier died on September 24, 1815, while on a mission in the territory of Alabama. In 1889 his remains were removed from an Alabama cotton field and brought to Knoxville for burial on the courthouse lawn. The articles for this episode describe in detail the excavation of the grave, the pageantry of Sevier Day, the gathering of dignitaries, and the pride of Knoxvillians in discharging "a duty incumbent upon her citizens."

Download the podcast here or subscribe for free to get new episodes automatically downloaded so you can listen whenever and wherever you want.

Additional resources:

Here's a brief biographical article about "Nolichucky Jack" from the Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture.

Treat yourself to a look at the Annals of Tennessee by J.G.M Ramsey, who advocated for bringing General Sevier's remains back to Tennessee but didn't live long enough to see it happen.

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Knox County Public Library Podcasts by Knox County Public Library is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. © 2008 Some Rights Reserved.

Historic Knoxville News #6: The Hike

In August of 1932 a party of nine members of the Smoky Mountains Hiking Club made what they believed to be the first continuous hike from one end of what would become the Great Smoky Mountains National Park to the other. Among the company was Harvey Broome, for whom the local chapter of the Sierra Club is named, and Carlos Campbell, who chronicled the adventure in his memoir, Memories of Old Smoky. By the kind permission of the Campbell family, we read an abridged version of his tale of the journey.

Download the podcast here.

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Additional resources:

The Great Smoky Mountains National Park by Steve Cotham -- a pictorial history of the Park

Driven wild: how the fight against automobiles launched the modern wilderness movement by Paul S. Sutter -- explores the tension between those who wanted to exploit wild lands for the tourism industry and those who wanted to keep them preserved as wilderness

The mystery of George Masa (DVD) directed by Paul Bonesteel -- features the life and photographic career of George Masa, a Japanese immigrant to western North Carolina who photographed extensively in the Great Smoky Mountains, and whose works were instrumental in the creation of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park and the Appalachian Trail

Benton MacKaye and the history of the Appalachian Trail, with the text of his article advancing a vision of how the trail could teach people a different way of life

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Knox County Public Library Podcasts by Knox County Public Library is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. © 2008 Some Rights Reserved.

Historic Knoxville News #5: 1910 Appalachian Exposition

In 1910 the city of Knoxville prepared to receive half a million visitors (so it was hoped) to the Appalachian Exposition (transcript here). How would the crowds be managed? What would they see? Would they show up?

You can listen to the podcast here or subscribe for free to get new episodes automatically downloaded so you can listen whenever and wherever you want.

The William Goodman history is one of the best sources on the expositions of 1910, 1911, and 1913. Here's a short article from the Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture, and here's a postcard image. A photo of the Negro Building is in Two hundred years of Black culture in Knoxville, Tennessee : 1791 to 1991 by Robert J. Booker.

For more about the place of the expositions in the history of enterprise in Knoxville, read the excellent book Knoxville, Tennessee : a mountain city in the new South by William Bruce Wheeler.

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Knox County Public Library Podcasts by Knox County Public Library is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. © 2008 Some Rights Reserved.

Historic Knoxville News #4: Civil War tensions

This episode is based on three articles that tell of two eruptions of violence between Union and Confederate sympathizers during and just after the Civil War, both involving the prominent Baker family whose home is now the Baker Peters Jazz Club. The first event is the shooting death of Dr. Harvey Baker in his home (transcribed here), and the second is the lynching of his son in downtown Knoxville. Steve Cotham follows the readings with some comments about the Baker family and tensions between neighbors during this period.

You can download the recording here or subscribe for free to get new episodes automatically downloaded so you can listen whenever and wherever you want.

To read about the ghost legend of the Baker Peters house, check out Mysterious Knoxville by Charles Edwin Price. For more about Governor "Parson" Brownlow, see chapter 8 of Betsey Beeler Creekmore's book, Knoxville! or read this short biographical article (with portrait) from our Virtual Reference Library database.

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Knox County Public Library Podcasts by Knox County Public Library is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. © 2008 Some Rights Reserved.

Historic Knoxville News #3: the Fraterville mine disaster

The third episode in our podcast series based on readings of old Knoxville newspapers is about the catastrophic explosion of Fraterville mine in Coal Creek, TN (now Lake City) which killed 184 men and boys. Robby Griffith and Craig Smith read the May 20, 1902 front-page coverage, and Derek Washington sings a song based on some letters written by miners trapped without hope of rescue. Steve Cotham discusses the importance and dangers of coal mining.

You can download the recording here or subscribe for free to get new episodes automatically downloaded so you can listen whenever and wherever you want.

Resources: Here's a list of the major mining disasters since 1900 (you may be asked to enter your library card number for access). Steve mentions a related poem or song in the historic documents of the McClung Collection, and Melissa recommends the book Circling Windrock Mountain. You can also read the transcript of the newspaper articles (as arranged for recording).

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Knox County Public Library Podcasts by Knox County Public Library is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. © 2008 Some Rights Reserved.

A Death in the Family: A Restoration of the Author's Text

Agee_restoration James Agee's A Death in the Family has been a staple in American literature for 50 years, but it is not the novel the author intended to publish. University of Tennessee professor Michael A. Lofaro restored the novel to reflect the manuscript Agee left completed at his death. In this recording he discusses the new version: A Death in the Family: A Restoration of the Author's Text.

You can download the recording here or subscribe for free to get new episodes automatically downloaded so you can listen whenever and wherever you want.

Historic Knoxville News #2: The Defiant moonshiners

Here is the second episode in our podcast series based on readings of old Knoxville newspapers. This episode is titled "The Defiant Moonshiners" and is based on four articles (transcript here) published in various papers over several years, tracing the fate of one revenuer who was shot in an armed resistance of underground distillers. Robby Griffith reads the articles and McClung Collection Reference Assistant Danette Welch provides the historical context. The books she references are This republic of suffering: death and the American Civil War and Mormons & cowboys, moonshiners & Klansmen: federal law enforcement in the South & West, 1870-1893.

Special thanks for the music performed by Music Therapy, recorded at the Time Warp.

You can download the recording here or subscribe for free to get new episodes automatically downloaded so you can listen whenever and wherever you want.


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Knox County Public Library Podcasts by Knox County Public Library is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. © 2008 Some Rights Reserved.

Historic Knoxville News #1: A Night on the Bowery

Here is the first in a new podcast series based on readings of old Knoxville newspapers. This article is "A Night on the Bowery," published in The Journal and Tribune, Sunday, July 8, 1900. One of the Library's fine actors, Robby Griffith, reads the article, after which Knox County Historian and librarian Steve Cotham provides the historical context. You can read a transcript of the article (as arranged for recording) here. Special thanks for the music performed by Music Therapy, recorded at the Time Warp.

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Knox County Public Library Podcasts by Knox County Public Library is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. © 2008 Some Rights Reserved.

From novel to film: the making of To Kill a Mockingbird

As part of our recent Big Read collaboration with the YWCA, the Library hosted discussions of the book To Kill A Mockingbird and a screening of the film. Gerald Wood, Dean of Humanites at Carson-Newman College and Barbara Moore, Professor in the School of Journalism and Electronic Media at the University of Tennessee joined us to discuss the film adaptation of the book. We recorded their remarks and you can download the recording here or use the player below.